Cascading impacts from the inability to communicate information & data

Gil Meyer – DuPont Director of Global Issues Management & Trend Analysis

Gil Meyer – DuPont Director of Global Issues Management & Trend Analysis

Forum Host Bill Raisch:  Gil, you’re charged with looking at global issues for DuPont.  The firm is active in a diversity of industries from agriculture to electronics and has a presence in over 90 countries.

What do you see as one of the most important disruptors facing global corporations, markets and/or wider society?

Gil Meyer:  Cybersecurity – Civil society and world economics rely on electronic systems in so many ways that a successful cyber-attack could seriously cripple our functioning. Few people seem to recognize how reliant we are on electronic systems and therefore how vulnerable our lifestyles are.

Bill Raisch:  What are the potential impacts of this disruptor?

Gil Meyer:  One example is that our ability to communicate information and data could collapse, which would undermine everything: emergency response, basic business transactions, all aspects of transportation, etc. The secondary and tertiary effects could be enormous.

Bill Raisch:  What strategies would you suggest to address this disruptor – to either mitigate negative impacts and/or to capitalize on potential opportunities?

Gil Meyer:  Society apparently assumes that the only way to operate the internet and other electronic systems is in a generally wide open fashion. That unchecked freedom is ideal for those who desire to disrupt. Eventually we will come to the realization that greater levels of control are needed. In all probability, that realization will only come after a major event.

Posted by Bill Raisch, Host – Global Disruptors Forum

The almost instantaneous loss of “trust equity”

Steve Parrish Former Senior Vice President, Altria Group (Kraft Foods, Philip Morris & Miller Brewing) & Current Principal, Steve Parrish Consulting

Steve Parrish Former Senior Vice President, Altria Group (Kraft Foods, Philip Morris & Miller Brewing) & Current Principal, Steve Parrish Consulting

Forum Host Bill Raisch:  Steve, you have decades of experience in crisis management, corporate social responsibility, public affairs and communications as a senior executive at Philip Morris and Altria as well as at a number of other major firms in a consulting capacity.  You have been at the nexus of crisis and communications in number of high profile situations.

From that vantage point, what do you see as one of the most important disruptors facing global corporations, markets and/or wider society?

Steve Parrish:  Information or communications (accurate or inaccurate) can almost instantaneously and negatively affect attitudes and perceptions of the company.

Bill Raisch:  What are the potential impacts of inaccurate information / communications?

Steve Parrish:  Because of the speed and global nature of information flow and the multitude of channels of communications, negative information or communications can erode, and in some cases even destroy, trust in a corporation’s brands and its image (a company’s “trust equity”).  This can happen with respect to opinion leaders, government officials and consumers, among others.  Depending upon pre-existing perceptions of a company and its products, it can take years to rebuild trust in the products and the corporate image.

Bill Raisch:  What strategies would you suggest to address this disruptor – to either mitigate negative impacts and/or to capitalize on potential opportunities?

Steve Parrish:   No one can guarantee that bad things will not happen.  No one can guarantee that inaccurate things will not be said.  No one can guarantee that things will not be misunderstood.  But, pre-existing relationships with key stakeholders, including critics–especially critics–can help.  Pre-existing relationships with key stakeholders can prevent the occurrence of some disruptors and speed the rehabilitation process with respect to others IF those relationships are built on respect and trust.

Posted by Bill Raisch, Host – Global Disruptors Forum

Lack of confidence in our data leading to distrust across government, business and wider society

Steve Chabinsky – Past Deputy Assistant Director, FBI Cyber Division; Current SVP - Legal Affairs & Chief Risk Officer, Crowd Strike

Steve Chabinsky – Fmr. Deputy Assistant Director, FBI Cyber Division; Current SVP – Legal Affairs & Chief Risk Officer, Crowd Strike

Forum Host Bill Raisch:  Steve, you organized and led the FBI’s Cyber Intelligence Program as well as serving in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.  You are now Chief Risk Officer for the cybersecurity technology firm, CrowdStrike.  You definitely have a distinct perspective on the cyber world.

What do you see as one of the most important disruptors facing global corporations, markets and/or wider society? 

Steve Chabinsky:  The increasing inability to have a high level of confidence that our data, as well as technology driven products and services, are and will remain (1) available;  (2) reliable; and (3) exclusively within the owners control.

Bill Raisch:  What are the potential impacts of this lack of confidence in data?

Steve Chabinsky:  Governments will be unable to rely upon their military platforms. Businesses and professional practices will be unable to protect corporate secrets, client confidences, or customer data, and will be unable to rely upon electronic commerce platforms. Society will grow to distrust technology, and will be at risk of loss of life when driving automobiles or having implanted medical devices, all of which can be hacked.

Bill Raisch:  What strategies would you suggest to address this disruptor – to either mitigate negative impacts and/or to capitalize on potential opportunities?

Steve Chabinsky:  The primary design element of certain technologies will begin to include assurance and attribution, allowing for quick detection of hostile activity, graceful declining of service, and attribution to determine responsibility.  Governments will begin to pay less attention to the impossible goal of security through invulnerability, and will start focusing first and foremost on threat mitigation efforts in coordination with the private sector.

Posted by Bill Raisch, Host – Global Disruptors Forum

Geopolitical

We welcome insights on Geopolitical Disruptions including but not limited to the following key areas:

  • China, Russia, India: Three Trajectories
  • Middle East Tinderbox: Evolving Arab Awakening, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria…
  • Widening Political Impasse in Key Nations
  • The World Stage in Flux: Stability of the Developing World
  • New Directions in Terrorism
  • Military and Warfare in the 21st Century

Natural / Environmental

We welcome insights on Natural / Environmental Disruptions included but not limited to the following key areas:

  • Extreme Weather & Climate Change
  • Food and Water Scarcity
  • Solar-Based Disruptions / Geomagnetic Storms / Space Weather
  • Increasing Impact of Natural Hazards: Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Volcanic Eruptions…

Societal

We welcome insights on emerging and prospective Societal Disruptions including but not limited to the following key areas:

  • Demographic Revolutions: Urbanization, aging, generational mixing, dynamic middle-class and others
  • Changing Consumer Behaviors & Developing Mega-Trends
  • Disruptive Forces in Sport
  • Explosive Violence: Civil Unrest, Backlash Against Globalization, Workplace Threats,
  • Contagion: Pandemic & Drug Resistant Bacteria
  • New Waves in Immigration: Likely reforms, costs and benefits to business
  • Hyper-Connectivity & the Volatility of Reputations

Economic

We welcome insights on emerging and prospective Economic Disruptions including but not limited to the following key areas:

  • Disruptive Trajectories in the Global Economy: Key Nations & Wider Ecosystems (the Chinese Mega-Cycle, the Eurozone, Developing Markets, Default Prospects)
  • Corporate Governance Disruptors: activist investors, demands for increased transparency, climate change reporting
  • A New Energy Mix: Oil to Methane, Coal Displaced?
  • Disruptions in Core Factors for Production: Labor Availability and Skills, Key Commodities, Water, Nationalization
  • Sweeping Market / Producer Consolidations
  • Volatile Swifts in Manufacturing, Outsourcing and Off-Shoring
  • Disruptions in the Global Supply Chain